My Dog Ate Chips Ahoy Cookies

November 18, 2022by DOGuide0

If you’re saying, “My dog ate Chips Ahoy cookies!” we know you’re concerned. The first thing you should know is that your furry friend is going to be okay. Keep reading to find out when to worry and what to do after your dog eats Chips Ahoy cookies.

My Dog Ate Chips Ahoy Cookies – Should I Worry?

If your dog ate Chips Ahoy cookies, you need to figure out how many chocolate chip cookies were eaten. Eating one Chips Ahoy cookie shouldn’t hurt your pup, but eating a whole bag of them may lead to illness.

dog ate chips ahoy cookies

The following information can help you decide how worried you should be after your dog ate Chips Ahoy cookies.

Dog Ate Half a Chocolate Chip Cookie

If your dog ate half a chocolate chip cookie or a piece of one, don’t worry. Your dog will most likely be perfectly fine. To be safe, look for the signs listed further down in this article. If your dog starts to exhibit the signs of chocolate poisoning, contact your veterinarian.

Dog Ate 2 Chocolate Chip Cookies

Eating 2 chocolate chip cookies may cause chocolate toxicity in your pup. It takes a significant amount of chocolate to harm a dog. Of course, it all has to do with body weight, so small dogs can suffer from the toxic effects of chocolate much sooner than large dogs.

Dog Ate a Dozen Chocolate Chip Cookies

If you’re saying my dog ate Chips Ahoy cookies and it was a dozen or a whole bag of them, contact your veterinarian immediately for an appointment. If your vet’s office is closed, call the Pet Poison Helpline at 800-213-6680 or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435.

You should not wait for the signs of chocolate toxicity because the sooner the chocolate cookies can be taken out of your dog’s body, the less chance of serious illness.

What Happens When Dogs Eat Chocolate

Chocolate is toxic to dogs BUT it’s rarely fatal. Chocolate has a chemical called theobromine. Theobromine is a diuretic, that stimulates the heart, and dilates blood vessels.

In addition to the theobromine, chocolate has caffeine in it, which is also a diuretic and heart stimulant.

How Much Chocolate Hurts Dogs?

The toxic dose of chocolate depends on the type of chocolate. Dark chocolate and baking chocolate have twice the amount of theobromine as semi-sweet chocolate and milk chocolate. White chocolate has the least amount of theobromine.

Note: Chips Ahoy cookies are made with semi-sweet chocolate.

To give you a good idea of how much chocolate can be toxic to dogs, a 50-pound dog needs 1 ounce of dark or baker’s chocolate or 9 ounces of milk chocolate to maybe show signs of chocolate toxicity.

A 20-pound dog needs half of the amounts above, so half an ounce of dark or baker’s chocolate and 4 or 5 ounces of milk chocolate.

Stomach sensitivity matters when it comes to suffering the effects of chocolate. Dogs with sensitive stomachs may feel ill from a much small dose of chocolate than identified above.

Keep in mind that it’s not just the chocolate in Chips Ahoy cookies that can make a dog sick. The sugar and fat in the cookies can cause serious stomach problems, such as pancreatitis. While it can take a lot on an ongoing basis to cause this type of illness, it’s still something to keep in mind, especially if your pup has a habit of eating fatty foods.

Symptoms of Chocolate Toxicity in Dogs

The toxic effects of chocolate ingestion depend on how much was consumed. The most common symptoms include:

These symptoms usually appear hours after chocolate ingestion and can last for days.

In serious cases, such as a dog ate a whole bag of Chips Ahoy cookies, the following symptoms should result in seeking immediate emergency vet attention.

  • Muscle Tremors
  • Seizures
  • Heart Failure

Seek immediate medical attention for your dog for the above symptoms.

dog sick

My Dog Ate Chips Ahoy Cookies: How to Prevent Reoccurrence

Dog owners know all too well the dangers of chocolate. That’s why they search “my dog ate Chips Ahoy cookies” when it happens.

We don’t have to tell you that the best way to prevent reoccurrence is to keep baked goods of all kinds out of reach. Accidents and break-ins happen.

Whenever you’re in doubt about how your best friend is doing after an accident happens, the best thing to do is contact your vet. Most of the time, vets tell dog owners to look for the above signs of chocolate toxicity unless the dog ate a lot of chocolate. In that case, there may need to be an intervention before symptoms appear.

Dog Ownership Guide hopes your furry best friend won’t suffer ill effects from his/her chocolate binge and it never happens again.

Will my dog be ok if he ate a chocolate chip cookie?

will my dog be ok if he ate a chocolate chip cookie
Yes, your dog will likely be okay, but if you notice your dog is vomiting, thirsty, panting, restless, urinating more, and having diarrhea, contact your vet immediately or Animal Poison Control at 888-426-4435. .

What if a dog eats a chocolate chip cookie?

what if a dog eats a chocolate cookie
If your dog eats a chocolate chip cookie, nothing may happen, but sometimes, dogs get sick. If you notice vomiting, an increase in thirstiness, diarrhea, panting and restlessness, contact your vet immediately or Animal Poison Control at 888-426-4435. .

What happens if my dog eats a chocolate chip cookie?

what happens if my dog eats a chocolate chip
If your dog only eats one chocolate chip, it will likely not hurt your pup. If you notice your dog vomiting, having diarrhea, panting, drinking more water, and being restless, contact your vet immediately or Animal Poison Control at 888-426-4435.

by DOGuide

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